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mangrove snapper technique?


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#1 etan

etan

Posted 08 August 2008 - 01:33 PM

With the endangered red snapper season now closed its time for a new target. The only time I ever targeted mangroves was with an offshore guide. We used a light slip sinker above a circle hook baited with a menhadden. The technique was to cast the bait into the rig and let it slowly settle. We were pretty successful with that technique. Has anyone out there targeted mangrove and what technique did you use. Mangroves are good eating and good fighters.

#2 Snagged

Snagged

Posted 08 August 2008 - 01:49 PM

I've used a small baited jig for them
Jerry
Uh oh, Snagged again!:eek:

#3 Bret

Bret

Posted 08 August 2008 - 01:51 PM

Nate, I have found if you get up close to a rig leg, you can cut up some small pieces of chum and chum them up.. use small 4/0 circle and egg sinker(just large enough to get it down) and get to work. (ps, dont tell anybody, but you can do the same thing at the ut pier, inside the jetties..)

#4 kidflex

kidflex

Posted 08 August 2008 - 01:58 PM

last time i fished for mangrove snappers we chummed them up. then freelined a piece of menhadden. this technique was pretty successful.

#5 papio

papio

Posted 08 August 2008 - 02:06 PM

Yes, mangoes can be caught at channel piers. I caught many at Ingelside Navy pier during fall months. Biggest was shy of 10lbs. They highly prefered live shrimp to anything else.

After 9/11 no fishing were allowed. Maybe after the base closes anglers will be able to fish there again. Also, IMO, the best mango and flounder grounds in the state. Please don't tell anyone.

#6 Uncle Russ

Uncle Russ

Posted 08 August 2008 - 02:22 PM

Papio: When is that closing supposed to happen? I'm moving down there in a year and want fo find a place to take my grandkids.

Russ
"Tschirhart: Helluva deal. You bait the hooks--I catch the fish!--Grimm."

#7 JerseyBrian

JerseyBrian

Posted 08 August 2008 - 02:41 PM

They highly prefered live shrimp to anything else. .

yup ;)

Just curious to know how many Rods/Reels you bring with you on a Trip either local or traveling?

so many that you get those looks from others like "WTF is he doing"


#8 papio

papio

Posted 08 August 2008 - 02:54 PM

Uncle R, don't actually know when, what year, date & time. Time to time I trek out there to see what's going on, will let u all know on current happenings. Last info i got is some buisness or school will be moving in. I'm hoping whoever with the stick is a crazy fishermen like us and will open the area fo public fishing. Heck, I'll pay $ to fish there anytime.

#9 thatrobguy

thatrobguy

Posted 22 May 2009 - 07:46 PM

Go light line, as light as your are comfortable with, I use 20#, and freeline if currents allow. 4/0 to 5/0 circle hooks. I use daiichi hooks, D84Z. If fishing near rigs, pitch inside the legs, they are very timid. If you are having problems with smaller fish like spadefish or triggers, bait with both squid and sardine. The spades will attack the sqiud and draw the attention of the mangroves. Then they will move in for the kill. I've caught several 10 lbs + mangroves using this technique. Good Luck and let me know how it works for you.

#10 rparham82

rparham82

Posted 22 May 2009 - 08:13 PM

last time i fished for mangrove snappers we chummed them up. then freelined a piece of menhadden. this technique was pretty successful.


After we get them up we start fishing with 40# flouro and make sure we bury the hook in a piece of chum in such a way that no part of the hook is visible, if they eat on 40# great if not work your way down to 20# until they eat. If you want to go the live bait route over here the hands down best mangrove bait is live croaker. You can go heavier leader with the livies ( 40-50#) as the fish don't seem to mind as much. Also these guys are pretty smart and if you break off two or three some times they will quit biting and at this point you should go ahead and move to another spot.

#11 capt.Keithswalton

capt.Keithswalton

Posted 15 August 2009 - 02:03 AM

If your still interested in a mangrove snapper technique...give this a shot. It's actually amazing how well it works. Use about a 25 to 30lb leader and a smallish circle hook, 4/0...5/0. Tie this directly to the main line, or you can use a small barrel swivel. The key here is no weight. Mix a 7lb block of melted chum(I use menhadden milk) juice and all in a 5 gallons bucket. I just put it in there the night before I go fishing. Start mixing that with fine sand (from the beach or I am lazy and buy leveling sand from Home Depot) mix sand into the chum until it will hold together in a sort of baseball. Usually about half the bucket or a little more in total mix. If you are working in water less than 50ft deep or so, this will work. If you are going to be working deeper, Mix in some oatmeal. When you are positioned up to your rig leg, or whatever you are fishing around, bait the hook with cut bait (fresh is best as it does not fall apart like frozen and later you will know why this is key too). Take a baseball sized glob of this chum/sand mix and tightly pack your hook and bait inside. Squeeze it tightly and get as much liquid out as you can. Now with a person working the rod, or the rod in a holder (I use a spinning rod with the bail open, but a convential reel with the clicker on will work)...As close to the water as you can reach lay this chumball into the water. This sounds crazy, but the dag on thing actually stays together and the weight of the sand will cary it all the way to the bottom. Count how long it takes for it to reach the bottom...1 thousand 1, 1 thousand 2, etc...
When it hits the bottom, take your fingers on the main line and give it a little "jerk". This breaks up the chumball and thus begins the frenzy around your bait (this jerk will usually jerk the softer frozen bait right off the hook). Leave the bail open or reel in freespool and let the bait drift in the current. The lack of a weight is the key to the whole process...now your drifting bait looks natural. Once you feel it being eatin (braids work best for this) let the fish eat for a few seconds...then close the bail and retrieve. It should be a snapper and most likely either a yellow tail or a mangrove. The beauty of this technique is you can now use the breaking of the chumball to bring the snapper up in the water column by breaking it further and further away from the bottom. Once you catch a few at depth, take 1 thousand off your count bring them closer and closer to the surface as you break the chumball closer and closer. I fill my cooler in very short order with this technique. Oviously other species will hit it too, but the Mangoes are really taken in by it...And this is the most ecinomical use of chum...putting it directly where it needs to be....It's a beautiful thing...

#12 d-a

d-a

Posted 15 August 2009 - 02:23 AM

If your still interested in a mangrove snapper technique...give this a shot. It's actually amazing how well it works. Use about a 25 to 30lb leader and a smallish circle hook, 4/0...5/0. Tie this directly to the main line, or you can use a small barrel swivel. The key here is no weight. Mix a 7lb block of melted chum(I use menhadden milk) juice and all in a 5 gallons bucket. I just put it in there the night before I go fishing. Start mixing that with fine sand (from the beach or I am lazy and buy leveling sand from Home Depot) mix sand into the chum until it will hold together in a sort of baseball. Usually about half the bucket or a little more in total mix. If you are working in water less than 50ft deep or so, this will work. If you are going to be working deeper, Mix in some oatmeal. When you are positioned up to your rig leg, or whatever you are fishing around, bait the hook with cut bait (fresh is best as it does not fall apart like frozen and later you will know why this is key too). Take a baseball sized glob of this chum/sand mix and tightly pack your hook and bait inside. Squeeze it tightly and get as much liquid out as you can. Now with a person working the rod, or the rod in a holder (I use a spinning rod with the bail open, but a convential reel with the clicker on will work)...As close to the water as you can reach lay this chumball into the water. This sounds crazy, but the dag on thing actually stays together and the weight of the sand will cary it all the way to the bottom. Count how long it takes for it to reach the bottom...1 thousand 1, 1 thousand 2, etc...
When it hits the bottom, take your fingers on the main line and give it a little "jerk". This breaks up the chumball and thus begins the frenzy around your bait (this jerk will usually jerk the softer frozen bait right off the hook). Leave the bail open or reel in freespool and let the bait drift in the current. The lack of a weight is the key to the whole process...now your drifting bait looks natural. Once you feel it being eatin (braids work best for this) let the fish eat for a few seconds...then close the bail and retrieve. It should be a snapper and most likely either a yellow tail or a mangrove. The beauty of this technique is you can now use the breaking of the chumball to bring the snapper up in the water column by breaking it further and further away from the bottom. Once you catch a few at depth, take 1 thousand off your count bring them closer and closer to the surface as you break the chumball closer and closer. I fill my cooler in very short order with this technique. Oviously other species will hit it too, but the Mangoes are really taken in by it...And this is the most ecinomical use of chum...putting it directly where it needs to be....It's a beautiful thing...


Thats the same way I catch Yellow tail snappa in the keys. The mangrove in the upper gulf will come up to the surface with just a normal bag of chum, of course night time is best.

d-a
The first requisite of a good citizen in this republic of ours is that he shall be able and willing to pull his own weight.

#13 cabosandinh

cabosandinh
  • LocationRepublic of Texas

Posted 15 August 2009 - 08:19 AM

in the GOM how do you get your bait down there without it being eaten
by other snappers? the reds are all over the bottom to 30ft above

#14 d-a

d-a

Posted 15 August 2009 - 08:49 AM

in the GOM how do you get your bait down there without it being eaten
by other snappers? the reds are all over the bottom to 30ft above


Chum will bring them up and then you can sight fish them and choose the ones you want to catch

d-a
The first requisite of a good citizen in this republic of ours is that he shall be able and willing to pull his own weight.

#15 lite-liner

lite-liner

Posted 15 August 2009 - 08:56 AM

Capt. Keith- I hereby nominate you for best first post of 2009!:D
Welcome to the forum.
that is a great technique that not everybody knows about.
what is the purpose of using oatmeal if going deeper? does it just hold it together longer?

#16 capt.Keithswalton

capt.Keithswalton

Posted 15 August 2009 - 07:01 PM

Yes, that is exactly correct. I found at about 60 ft it does not stay together very well...the oatmeal gives it some added staying power. I have been trying for years to get snapper behind my boat hanging a bag of chum, but it never seemed to work, I had bait fish, but never any snapper. I think the stronger Gulf current was carrying it over the top of the wreck or structure and they never got a "whif". Since doing this, I get em up first and then they hang around the back of the boat. I am now experimenting with variations of this theme to get other fish biting. I have only been fishing for a little over two years in Naples...it's tough there as there is not a lot of structure around...flat and shallow up to 100miles out. Thanks for the vote of confidence Lite Liner. I am learning a lot about gear here...was suprised to see a posting about snapper....

Cabosandinh, I have found this method really generates the bite and on a good day, you can literally catch a snapper on every drop. You can limit out in less than an hour, that's 10 snapper in fedral waters. For me, I don't have the red snapper in Naples, but I can immagine if you are catching a snapper every 4 or 5 minutes, it becomes a numbers game. If you have a succesful method that yields high numbers, Vent (if needed) and throw the red snapper back. Keep the Mangos and other legals. Also, Maybe you can target mangos closer to the beach. I know in Naples, they hang...well in the mangroves, so they are just about everywhere. Of course the larger ones are further out. I have to go 30 miles out to get a yellow tail. I don't know if the Reds hang in shallower water or not. Experiment with this method, I learned of it about 8 months ago or so and have had wild sucesses with it and am using the method to place chum where I want it in the water colum. When you Sibiki on the surface if the fish don't bite, you throw chum in the water and they attack everything in site and you load up the rig. I am experimenting with placing a ball on my sibiki weight and breaking it above the bottom, then jigging the hooks through it to get some pin fish and better and bigger bait fish for free lining. I think the possiblitities are endless with this method and you can just take it and experiment with it...I work offshore (West coast of Africa used to be in the GOM) and when I get home this time I am going to use a tea ball (yea that thing you put tea in and dunk in hot water) stuffed with dry or wet chum a foot or two above a 12 0z Bucktail and see if it excites the grouper any. I gotta attach it so they can't swollow it, but I am going to experiment...It's fun and different and I like to try new things. That too is a numbers game off Naples...you gotta catch 20 grouper to get a keeper, so you gotta catch a lot...I'll keep you posted.

#17 cabosandinh

cabosandinh
  • LocationRepublic of Texas

Posted 20 August 2009 - 07:27 AM

Capt Keith

thanks again for great info on specific chumming and
mangroves technique. Now that Fed snapper season is over
I'll have to step up my game and learn to target mangroves.
I do have chum bags, chum buckets, but the
few times I tried using them I got kings and not snappers.

How do you tell if it's cubera or mangroves without looking
at the tooth patch ?

Does Menhadden oil work for mangroves?

I am heading out again on Sept 19 ... I've got chumming
on my mind.

post some pics of your new adventures

San

#18 cabosandinh

cabosandinh
  • LocationRepublic of Texas

Posted 20 August 2009 - 07:34 AM

this screen shows a graph that is full of red and mangroves;
I was pulling up 1 mangrove for every 4 red

#19 Eastern Tackle

Eastern Tackle

Posted 20 August 2009 - 08:28 AM

Capt. Keith- I hereby nominate you for best first post of 2009!:D


I'll second that nomination.
Vertical Jigs @ Eastern Tackle <---Click Here

#20 spineyman

spineyman

Posted 20 August 2009 - 12:46 PM

Right now out of Destin the red snapper are so thick it might take a long long time to get a mangrove snapper to bite.




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